Tips from the Experts

Sometimes, there are things you just learn over time. Our team of experts have shared some of the trade secrets they have learned through successes and failures.

Jim Davidson

Jim Davidson is the Managing Partner at SprayWorks Equipment Group. He has 50 years of experience in the spray foam industry and has worked alongside many of the industry pioneers. Jim has designed and created industry equipment such as; Spraybot, Barrel Blazer, Roboliner and Polybot - among others.

John Davidson

John Davidson is the VP of Operations at SprayWorks Equipment Group and is an SPFA PCP Certified Roofing and Insulation Installer. With over 25 years of experience in the spray foam and polyurea industry, John brings a wealth of knowledge and hands-on experience. He has worked on commercial and residential buildings, bridges and infrastructure.

Dave Penta

Dave Penta is the VP of Sales at SprayWorks Equipment Group. For the past 30+ years, Dave has worked with multiple industries including; commercial and residential buildings, along with spray foam and coatings systems.

SPRAY GUNS

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Prepare for Cold Weather

With the cold weather quickly approaching and roughly 20 good working days between now and Thanksgiving, it’s important to make the most of product yield and production by being prepared. Make sure drums are warm and ready for the job by keeping them heated with products such as the Barrel Blazer heating system. Temps are dropping in evening, so container temps are going to drop. Plan ahead and be effective!

Gun Cleaner for Minimizing Wear on Parts

Torching, picking, sanding, and wire brushing off the gun and related parts often does more damage than good. At best, it cleans the parts but accelerates service life by abrasive cleaning. Utilizing an effective gun cleaner to reduce excessive cleaning of parts is recommended. Generally, a quality gun cleaner can clean parts within 15-20 minutes when the gun cleaner is heated overnight at room temperatures.

Watch for Crystals Forming in your Hose

When winterizing and storing hoses over an extended amount of time, be sure to clean the system thoroughly. Often, the flush and remaining isocyanate will separate over time. With the isocyanate clinging to the hose walls, fittings and various locations throughout the equipment doesn’t come out 100% with an initial flush. As a result, when the hose is put back in service, the heating required will cause expansion – dis-bonding the settled isocyanate. To help prevent this, be sure to thoroughly flush the system and follow up with a second flush within 3-4 days. This action will allow time for the remaining isocyanate to settle and be cleared with clean flush.

Check Equipment for Moisture Buildup

AIR-VALVEGenerally, when you check equipment for moisture buildup – you’re bleeding your pressure system and tanks. However, over time, moisture sometimes builds up in your spray foam hose air line. Periodic maintenance of the air line is required.

To safely remove moisture, complete these steps; place a fitting/dump valve into the air line that normally connects to the spray gun, turn on your air system, open the dump valve, then run the system wide open for 15 minutes or until moisture is displaced. These steps should be done in a safe area, suitable to rapid air release.

Pre-greasing Gun Parts

Most new-age spray guns are equipped with a grease fitting to lubricate the gun after service. However, pre-greasing each and every par,t within the wet end of the spray gun during assembly, assures each part is properly greased – without relying solely on the zurk fitting.

HOSES

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Prepare for Cold Weather

With the cold weather quickly approaching and roughly 20 good working days between now and Thanksgiving, it’s important to make the most of product yield and production by being prepared. Make sure drums are warm and ready for the job by keeping them heated with products such as the Barrel Blazer heating system. Temps are dropping in evening, so container temps are going to drop. Plan ahead and be effective!

Gun Cleaner for Minimizing Wear on Parts

Torching, picking, sanding, and wire brushing off the gun and related parts often does more damage than good. At best, it cleans the parts but accelerates service life by abrasive cleaning. Utilizing an effective gun cleaner to reduce excessive cleaning of parts is recommended. Generally, a quality gun cleaner can clean parts within 15-20 minutes when the gun cleaner is heated overnight at room temperatures.

Watch for Crystals Forming in your Hose

When winterizing and storing hoses over an extended amount of time, be sure to clean the system thoroughly. Often, the flush and remaining isocyanate will separate over time. With the isocyanate clinging to the hose walls, fittings and various locations throughout the equipment doesn’t come out 100% with an initial flush. As a result, when the hose is put back in service, the heating required will cause expansion – dis-bonding the settled isocyanate. To help prevent this, be sure to thoroughly flush the system and follow up with a second flush within 3-4 days. This action will allow time for the remaining isocyanate to settle and be cleared with clean flush.

Check Equipment for Moisture Buildup

AIR-VALVEGenerally, when you check equipment for moisture buildup – you’re bleeding your pressure system and tanks. However, over time, moisture sometimes builds up in your spray foam hose air line. Periodic maintenance of the air line is required.

To safely remove moisture, complete these steps; place a fitting/dump valve into the air line that normally connects to the spray gun, turn on your air system, open the dump valve, then run the system wide open for 15 minutes or until moisture is displaced. These steps should be done in a safe area, suitable to rapid air release.

Pre-greasing Gun Parts

Most new-age spray guns are equipped with a grease fitting to lubricate the gun after service. However, pre-greasing each and every par,t within the wet end of the spray gun during assembly, assures each part is properly greased – without relying solely on the zurk fitting.

TRANSFER PUMPS

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Prepare for Cold Weather

With the cold weather quickly approaching and roughly 20 good working days between now and Thanksgiving, it’s important to make the most of product yield and production by being prepared. Make sure drums are warm and ready for the job by keeping them heated with products such as the Barrel Blazer heating system. Temps are dropping in evening, so container temps are going to drop. Plan ahead and be effective!

Gun Cleaner for Minimizing Wear on Parts

Torching, picking, sanding, and wire brushing off the gun and related parts often does more damage than good. At best, it cleans the parts but accelerates service life by abrasive cleaning. Utilizing an effective gun cleaner to reduce excessive cleaning of parts is recommended. Generally, a quality gun cleaner can clean parts within 15-20 minutes when the gun cleaner is heated overnight at room temperatures.

Watch for Crystals Forming in your Hose

When winterizing and storing hoses over an extended amount of time, be sure to clean the system thoroughly. Often, the flush and remaining isocyanate will separate over time. With the isocyanate clinging to the hose walls, fittings and various locations throughout the equipment doesn’t come out 100% with an initial flush. As a result, when the hose is put back in service, the heating required will cause expansion – dis-bonding the settled isocyanate. To help prevent this, be sure to thoroughly flush the system and follow up with a second flush within 3-4 days. This action will allow time for the remaining isocyanate to settle and be cleared with clean flush.

Check Equipment for Moisture Buildup

AIR-VALVEGenerally, when you check equipment for moisture buildup – you’re bleeding your pressure system and tanks. However, over time, moisture sometimes builds up in your spray foam hose air line. Periodic maintenance of the air line is required.

To safely remove moisture, complete these steps; place a fitting/dump valve into the air line that normally connects to the spray gun, turn on your air system, open the dump valve, then run the system wide open for 15 minutes or until moisture is displaced. These steps should be done in a safe area, suitable to rapid air release.

Pre-greasing Gun Parts

Most new-age spray guns are equipped with a grease fitting to lubricate the gun after service. However, pre-greasing each and every par,t within the wet end of the spray gun during assembly, assures each part is properly greased – without relying solely on the zurk fitting.

SCREENS & FILTERS

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Prepare for Cold Weather

With the cold weather quickly approaching and roughly 20 good working days between now and Thanksgiving, it’s important to make the most of product yield and production by being prepared. Make sure drums are warm and ready for the job by keeping them heated with products such as the Barrel Blazer heating system. Temps are dropping in evening, so container temps are going to drop. Plan ahead and be effective!

Gun Cleaner for Minimizing Wear on Parts

Torching, picking, sanding, and wire brushing off the gun and related parts often does more damage than good. At best, it cleans the parts but accelerates service life by abrasive cleaning. Utilizing an effective gun cleaner to reduce excessive cleaning of parts is recommended. Generally, a quality gun cleaner can clean parts within 15-20 minutes when the gun cleaner is heated overnight at room temperatures.

Watch for Crystals Forming in your Hose

When winterizing and storing hoses over an extended amount of time, be sure to clean the system thoroughly. Often, the flush and remaining isocyanate will separate over time. With the isocyanate clinging to the hose walls, fittings and various locations throughout the equipment doesn’t come out 100% with an initial flush. As a result, when the hose is put back in service, the heating required will cause expansion – dis-bonding the settled isocyanate. To help prevent this, be sure to thoroughly flush the system and follow up with a second flush within 3-4 days. This action will allow time for the remaining isocyanate to settle and be cleared with clean flush.

Check Equipment for Moisture Buildup

AIR-VALVEGenerally, when you check equipment for moisture buildup – you’re bleeding your pressure system and tanks. However, over time, moisture sometimes builds up in your spray foam hose air line. Periodic maintenance of the air line is required.

To safely remove moisture, complete these steps; place a fitting/dump valve into the air line that normally connects to the spray gun, turn on your air system, open the dump valve, then run the system wide open for 15 minutes or until moisture is displaced. These steps should be done in a safe area, suitable to rapid air release.

Pre-greasing Gun Parts

Most new-age spray guns are equipped with a grease fitting to lubricate the gun after service. However, pre-greasing each and every par,t within the wet end of the spray gun during assembly, assures each part is properly greased – without relying solely on the zurk fitting.

WEATHER

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Prepare for Cold Weather

With the cold weather quickly approaching and roughly 20 good working days between now and Thanksgiving, it’s important to make the most of product yield and production by being prepared. Make sure drums are warm and ready for the job by keeping them heated with products such as the Barrel Blazer heating system. Temps are dropping in evening, so container temps are going to drop. Plan ahead and be effective!

Gun Cleaner for Minimizing Wear on Parts

Torching, picking, sanding, and wire brushing off the gun and related parts often does more damage than good. At best, it cleans the parts but accelerates service life by abrasive cleaning. Utilizing an effective gun cleaner to reduce excessive cleaning of parts is recommended. Generally, a quality gun cleaner can clean parts within 15-20 minutes when the gun cleaner is heated overnight at room temperatures.

Watch for Crystals Forming in your Hose

When winterizing and storing hoses over an extended amount of time, be sure to clean the system thoroughly. Often, the flush and remaining isocyanate will separate over time. With the isocyanate clinging to the hose walls, fittings and various locations throughout the equipment doesn’t come out 100% with an initial flush. As a result, when the hose is put back in service, the heating required will cause expansion – dis-bonding the settled isocyanate. To help prevent this, be sure to thoroughly flush the system and follow up with a second flush within 3-4 days. This action will allow time for the remaining isocyanate to settle and be cleared with clean flush.

Check Equipment for Moisture Buildup

AIR-VALVEGenerally, when you check equipment for moisture buildup – you’re bleeding your pressure system and tanks. However, over time, moisture sometimes builds up in your spray foam hose air line. Periodic maintenance of the air line is required.

To safely remove moisture, complete these steps; place a fitting/dump valve into the air line that normally connects to the spray gun, turn on your air system, open the dump valve, then run the system wide open for 15 minutes or until moisture is displaced. These steps should be done in a safe area, suitable to rapid air release.

Pre-greasing Gun Parts

Most new-age spray guns are equipped with a grease fitting to lubricate the gun after service. However, pre-greasing each and every par,t within the wet end of the spray gun during assembly, assures each part is properly greased – without relying solely on the zurk fitting.

PROCESS & DOCUMENTATION

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Prepare for Cold Weather

With the cold weather quickly approaching and roughly 20 good working days between now and Thanksgiving, it’s important to make the most of product yield and production by being prepared. Make sure drums are warm and ready for the job by keeping them heated with products such as the Barrel Blazer heating system. Temps are dropping in evening, so container temps are going to drop. Plan ahead and be effective!

Gun Cleaner for Minimizing Wear on Parts

Torching, picking, sanding, and wire brushing off the gun and related parts often does more damage than good. At best, it cleans the parts but accelerates service life by abrasive cleaning. Utilizing an effective gun cleaner to reduce excessive cleaning of parts is recommended. Generally, a quality gun cleaner can clean parts within 15-20 minutes when the gun cleaner is heated overnight at room temperatures.

Watch for Crystals Forming in your Hose

When winterizing and storing hoses over an extended amount of time, be sure to clean the system thoroughly. Often, the flush and remaining isocyanate will separate over time. With the isocyanate clinging to the hose walls, fittings and various locations throughout the equipment doesn’t come out 100% with an initial flush. As a result, when the hose is put back in service, the heating required will cause expansion – dis-bonding the settled isocyanate. To help prevent this, be sure to thoroughly flush the system and follow up with a second flush within 3-4 days. This action will allow time for the remaining isocyanate to settle and be cleared with clean flush.

Check Equipment for Moisture Buildup

AIR-VALVEGenerally, when you check equipment for moisture buildup – you’re bleeding your pressure system and tanks. However, over time, moisture sometimes builds up in your spray foam hose air line. Periodic maintenance of the air line is required.

To safely remove moisture, complete these steps; place a fitting/dump valve into the air line that normally connects to the spray gun, turn on your air system, open the dump valve, then run the system wide open for 15 minutes or until moisture is displaced. These steps should be done in a safe area, suitable to rapid air release.

Pre-greasing Gun Parts

Most new-age spray guns are equipped with a grease fitting to lubricate the gun after service. However, pre-greasing each and every par,t within the wet end of the spray gun during assembly, assures each part is properly greased – without relying solely on the zurk fitting.