Tips from the Experts

Sometimes, there are things you just learn over time. Our team of experts have shared some of the trade secrets they have learned through successes and failures.

Jim Davidson

Jim Davidson is the Managing Partner at SprayWorks Equipment Group. He has 50 years of experience in the spray foam industry and has worked alongside many of the industry pioneers. Jim has designed and created industry equipment such as; Spraybot, Barrel Blazer, Roboliner and Polybot - among others.

John Davidson

John Davidson is the VP of Operations at SprayWorks Equipment Group and is an SPFA PCP Certified Roofing and Insulation Installer, Roofing and Insulation Project Manager, and Supplier Rep. With over 30 years of experience in the spray foam and polyurea industry, John brings a wealth of knowledge and hands-on experience. He has worked on commercial and residential buildings, bridges and infrastructure.

Dave Penta

Dave Penta is the VP of Sales at SprayWorks Equipment Group. For the past 30+ years, Dave has worked with multiple industries including; commercial and residential buildings, along with spray foam and coatings systems.

SPRAY GUNS

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Changing Over Material

Logan ManifoldChanging material from Open Cell to Closed Cell or vice versa can result in many issues with product loss, cross contamination or time loss.  By using the Logan Manifold you are able to quickly and efficiently change from one material type to the next without wasting extra time or material. 

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Proper hose care

When heating up your hose, I highly recommend unravelling the bulk of it. There are two reasons why.

One – the hose will create hot spots and could potentially get to the point where the hose would melt and burst open after an extended period of time. The second reason – as you spray material, you’ll get inconsistent heat and as your material cures, your application will become poor and inconsistent.

Best Tool to Have

As Spray Foam Technicians, we recommend one tool you should have on hand that can keep you and your crew up and running. When you suspect that you may have an electrical issue and need to contact a tech for help, one of the first things you may be asked is to confirm voltage’s through the spray system. Having a Multi-Meter on hand in your spray rig will help you to easily determine the answers you need to get your system up and running asap.

HOSES

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Changing Over Material

Logan ManifoldChanging material from Open Cell to Closed Cell or vice versa can result in many issues with product loss, cross contamination or time loss.  By using the Logan Manifold you are able to quickly and efficiently change from one material type to the next without wasting extra time or material. 

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Proper hose care

When heating up your hose, I highly recommend unravelling the bulk of it. There are two reasons why.

One – the hose will create hot spots and could potentially get to the point where the hose would melt and burst open after an extended period of time. The second reason – as you spray material, you’ll get inconsistent heat and as your material cures, your application will become poor and inconsistent.

Best Tool to Have

As Spray Foam Technicians, we recommend one tool you should have on hand that can keep you and your crew up and running. When you suspect that you may have an electrical issue and need to contact a tech for help, one of the first things you may be asked is to confirm voltage’s through the spray system. Having a Multi-Meter on hand in your spray rig will help you to easily determine the answers you need to get your system up and running asap.

TRANSFER PUMPS

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Changing Over Material

Logan ManifoldChanging material from Open Cell to Closed Cell or vice versa can result in many issues with product loss, cross contamination or time loss.  By using the Logan Manifold you are able to quickly and efficiently change from one material type to the next without wasting extra time or material. 

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Proper hose care

When heating up your hose, I highly recommend unravelling the bulk of it. There are two reasons why.

One – the hose will create hot spots and could potentially get to the point where the hose would melt and burst open after an extended period of time. The second reason – as you spray material, you’ll get inconsistent heat and as your material cures, your application will become poor and inconsistent.

Best Tool to Have

As Spray Foam Technicians, we recommend one tool you should have on hand that can keep you and your crew up and running. When you suspect that you may have an electrical issue and need to contact a tech for help, one of the first things you may be asked is to confirm voltage’s through the spray system. Having a Multi-Meter on hand in your spray rig will help you to easily determine the answers you need to get your system up and running asap.

SCREENS & FILTERS

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Changing Over Material

Logan ManifoldChanging material from Open Cell to Closed Cell or vice versa can result in many issues with product loss, cross contamination or time loss.  By using the Logan Manifold you are able to quickly and efficiently change from one material type to the next without wasting extra time or material. 

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Proper hose care

When heating up your hose, I highly recommend unravelling the bulk of it. There are two reasons why.

One – the hose will create hot spots and could potentially get to the point where the hose would melt and burst open after an extended period of time. The second reason – as you spray material, you’ll get inconsistent heat and as your material cures, your application will become poor and inconsistent.

Best Tool to Have

As Spray Foam Technicians, we recommend one tool you should have on hand that can keep you and your crew up and running. When you suspect that you may have an electrical issue and need to contact a tech for help, one of the first things you may be asked is to confirm voltage’s through the spray system. Having a Multi-Meter on hand in your spray rig will help you to easily determine the answers you need to get your system up and running asap.

WEATHER

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Changing Over Material

Logan ManifoldChanging material from Open Cell to Closed Cell or vice versa can result in many issues with product loss, cross contamination or time loss.  By using the Logan Manifold you are able to quickly and efficiently change from one material type to the next without wasting extra time or material. 

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Proper hose care

When heating up your hose, I highly recommend unravelling the bulk of it. There are two reasons why.

One – the hose will create hot spots and could potentially get to the point where the hose would melt and burst open after an extended period of time. The second reason – as you spray material, you’ll get inconsistent heat and as your material cures, your application will become poor and inconsistent.

Best Tool to Have

As Spray Foam Technicians, we recommend one tool you should have on hand that can keep you and your crew up and running. When you suspect that you may have an electrical issue and need to contact a tech for help, one of the first things you may be asked is to confirm voltage’s through the spray system. Having a Multi-Meter on hand in your spray rig will help you to easily determine the answers you need to get your system up and running asap.

PROCESS & DOCUMENTATION

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your A Filter

I make it a habit to check my A Filter before I start every morning. To me, that’s the only way I can pressurize the machine and accurately read gauges to eliminate any problems. The reason I check the A Filter in the morning is, regardless of when the gun is cleaned the previous day, the cleaner tends to leave a layer of film on the screen.

Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Changing Over Material

Logan ManifoldChanging material from Open Cell to Closed Cell or vice versa can result in many issues with product loss, cross contamination or time loss.  By using the Logan Manifold you are able to quickly and efficiently change from one material type to the next without wasting extra time or material. 

Spray Gun Safety

Every gun has a safety feature. You should get in the habit of turning on the safety feature whenever you stop spraying – whether it’s to talk to someone or check your depth. It’s an often overlooked step when a new applicator is learning, but can quickly cause serious injury or damage if the spray gun releases unmanaged chemical.

Proper hose care

When heating up your hose, I highly recommend unravelling the bulk of it. There are two reasons why.

One – the hose will create hot spots and could potentially get to the point where the hose would melt and burst open after an extended period of time. The second reason – as you spray material, you’ll get inconsistent heat and as your material cures, your application will become poor and inconsistent.

Best Tool to Have

As Spray Foam Technicians, we recommend one tool you should have on hand that can keep you and your crew up and running. When you suspect that you may have an electrical issue and need to contact a tech for help, one of the first things you may be asked is to confirm voltage’s through the spray system. Having a Multi-Meter on hand in your spray rig will help you to easily determine the answers you need to get your system up and running asap.