Keep Your B-Side Going

The B Side, in general, is less likely to cause contamination in the screens. As a result, B Side screens are often neglected.

One possible cause of B Side pressure loss is the collection of paint chips over time. Spray foam drums are recyclable and during the recycling process, some of the drums are repainted inside. Over time, the B component can soften the paint in the drum, causing it to flake off and collect in the Y-filter assembly – restricting flow to the machine. Making the Y-filter assembly a priority to clean can help prevent the collection of paint chips.

Check your hose temp at multiple points

When I find my equipment is spraying just right, I grab a pocket thermometer. With a variety of elements including sun and fluctuating temps outside, that’s what I use to maintain the temperature between my gun and proportioner.

I always stick a pocket thermometer at the halfway point of my hose, so if there’s 200 feet I stick it in the sleeve at 100 feet. This way, if the material sprays a little off, I just check that thermometer to ensure the hose is the same temp all the way through.

Restoring an Iso Hose

After several years of service, iso will form a buildup within the hose. We recommend doing a thorough strip and rinse of these hoses to assure full flow performance. Order our SprayWorks Power Flush System to restore those aging iso hoses or when winterizing the system. You’ll be amazed at the amount of old cured materials that will come out.

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Changing the Temperature Sensing Unit on Heated Hose

EL-51A-4-2TThe equipment used today for spraying plural component urethane foam and coatings provide the means to preheat the A and R chemicals, pressurize the chemical to the manufacturer’s recommended PSI and deliver that conditioned and heated chemical to the gun via a heated hose. Most units today utilize a system which provides automatic hose heat. The proportioners are equipped with a controller which receives a signal from a temperature sensing unit. The signal indicates the temperature of the chemical in the hose from a remote distance from the proportioner and ideally just before the gun.

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Watch for Crystals Forming in your Hose

When winterizing and storing hoses over an extended amount of time, be sure to clean the system thoroughly. Often, the flush and remaining isocyanate will separate over time. With the isocyanate clinging to the hose walls, fittings and various locations throughout the equipment doesn’t come out 100% with an initial flush. As a result, when the hose is put back in service, the heating required will cause expansion – dis-bonding the settled isocyanate. To help prevent this, be sure to thoroughly flush the system and follow up with a second flush within 3-4 days. This action will allow time for the remaining isocyanate to settle and be cleared with clean flush.

3 Ways to Care For Equipment in the Winter

Save Your Company Money and Time During Cold Temperatures

Weather has always been a factor on the logistics of completing jobs – especially cold weather. Most of us know, when the temperatures reach freezing the job is on hold. But what many of us don’t know is, what is the best way to store equipment and products during these freezing temperatures?

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Inspect Your Hoses

Over a short period of time, ISO material can accumulate on the pump – preventing the equipment from working correctly and causing potential damage. A quick daily inspection and removal of crystallization can prevent costly down time and will extend the life of your pump.

Follow this daily check with inspecting the bottom foot valve housing from potential obstruction. Lastly, color code the transfer pump ‘red’ for isocyanate and ‘blue’ for resin.

Service Hoses

It’s important to service hoses at least once per year. Periodic inspections assure the integrity of the protective wrap by repairing worn areas. Small, but mighty, the protective wrap is vital in protecting the hoses and electric lines. So, when hoses are rubbed or worn thin, bursting can happen. Also, when electric lines are exposed, shock hazards and hot spots are a real concern – resulting in poor heating performance and leading to failure, damages, and injury.

It seems tedious, but proper inspection and service of the hose requires removal of all protective coverings, inspection of each material, electrical and air line for slices or areas which have worn or the hose has pulled apart at the jacketing. If you see any corrosion in the fittings, a simple acid wash and wiping off excess areas with steel wool, will help. Make sure you wipe clean then apply a light film of rust inhibitive paint. Inspect all electrical connections and exposed wires, then repair as necessary to test for continuity. It’s vital to make sure connections are properly sealed from weather.

Lastly, perform a 15 minute working pressure test (confirm test pressures for specific hose) and then rewrap the hose accordingly. It seems like a lot of steps, but trust me, you’ll be glad you did it!